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 bajonet.be in english 
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01 jul 2008, 19:55
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Bericht Zwitserland
14

The difference between the M1914 and the earlier M1906 model is the shape of the blades’ point. The blade of the M1906 is straight whereas the M1914 broadens slightly right before the tip. Only the right side of the blade is fullered.
Scabbards exist in steel, the standard version, and the rarer leather models.

The M1914 is probably the last saw backed bayonet ever produced.

Het onderscheid tussen deze bajonet en de eerdere M1906 is gelegen in de punt van het lemmet. Bij de M1906 is het lemmet tot recht het uitloopt in een punt, bij de M1914 is er eerst een verbreding alvorens in een punt over te gaan. Het lemmet is enkel aan de rechterzijde voorzien van een bloedgeul.

18

Like other Swiss bayonets, this model can easily be recognised due to the typical shape of the handle and pommel. Less typical is the bayonet’s blade which is double edged whereas other Swiss bayonets’ blades only have a single edge..


57

This is a very simple but very efficient bayonet which can easily be used and cleaned. The M1857 SIG features a double edged blade and a black composite handle.


07 jul 2008, 14:47
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Bericht zweden
96

The Swedish M1896 features a short, double edged blade with a small fuller. The short overall length and the shape of the blade make this bayonet a very good knife.
Compared to other bayonets of the same era, the end of the 19th century, this bayonet is an oddball. The most remarkable difference with other bayonets is the handle; a hollow steel tube with a chequered surface and a vertical locking mechanism.

The bayonet could be unlocked by pulling the pin at the rear of the handle. This is easy to do with bare hands but proved to be difficult when wearing gloves. As Sweden counts between 75 and 180 days, depending on the location, of frost per year this was a rather important design flaw.


07 jul 2008, 14:47
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Bericht USA (gedeeltelijk, rest volgt)
M4

The introduction of the M1 carbine, developed by Winchester, was the first step in the direction of the PDW, Personal Defense Weapon. A short, light semi- or full automatic rifle that should make the carry of pistols and full size rifles no longer necessairy.

Initially the M1 was designed without a bayonet attachment but as some troops needed knives anyway, a bayonet lug was added to receive the M4 bayonet. This model was based on the M3 knife and introduced in 1944.

The M4 had all its metal parts parkerized and came with a leather handle. Examples with composite or wooden handles exist but these can be official as well as unofficial modifications.
On the blade an abbreviation of the manufacturer’s name is stamped, just like on M1 bayonets

The M1 carbine and the M4 bayonet remained in use until the Vietnam war and were replaced gradually by the M16 during the sixties.

E1

This variation of the M1905 was obtained by cutting down the M1905 blade to 25.4 centimetres and reshaping the point. There are 2 main variations; one with a double edged point (with the point in the middle of the blade) and one with a single cutting edge (with the bayonet’s point on the upper side of the blade).

The difference between the E1 and the newly made M1 bayonets is the length of the fuller. The fuller on the M1 ends about 7 centimetres from the tip whereas the fuller on the E1, as it is a ground down version of the M1905, continues into the point.

The E1 came in a glass fibre scabbard which was simply a shortened version of the M1905/42 glass fibre scabbard. Apart from the official name, E1, this bayonet is also called M1 1943.


1905/42

This bayonet is nearly identical to the standard M1905 bayonet, which was in use by the American army during the First World War. The handle of the M1905/42 is made of brown or black composite with the latter being more common.

The wooden handles of the M1905 were sometimes exchanged for composite samples. The only way to determine whether it a bayonet is a M1905 or M1905/42 is the year of manufacture. The M1905/42 was only made in 1942 and 1943 so all others are refurbished M1905’s. In general, the finishing on the M1905/42’s is of a slightly lesser quality.

As the M1905’s scabbard was very expensive to manufacture (a wooden inner scabbard covered with canvas or leather) the M1905/42 was issued with a new model M3 glass fibre scabbard invented by the Beckwith Manufacturing Co.

Later these bayonets were modified again by shortening the blade to 254 millimetres to meet M1905 E1 specifications.


07 jul 2008, 14:48
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Bericht 1917
The P1903 Springfield is generally considered as the high quality rifle with which the United States helped the Allied armies to reach the victory. It was the P1917 rifle which was part of most of the doughboy’s equipment though.
The P1917 could be equipped with the P1913/1914 or the M1917 “Eddystone” (after the Remington-Eddystone arsenal where much of the P1917 rifles were made).

The P1913/1914 and the M1917 are nearly identical as the only structural modification between both of them is the additional cleaning hole on the M1917. This was added to simplify the removal of dirt in the slot for the bayonet lug.

There are major differences in stamps though as the P1913/1914 is still stamped with typically British marks. This model was followed by a transitional version, which had the original British stamps struck through and US marks added (eagle head, “U S” and the ordnance logo which is also known as the “flaming onion”).
Finally the M1917 was stamped with “1917” as well as the same US marks as the transitional model. The “1917” does not refer to the year of production, just to the model name. The last 2 digits of the year of manufacture can be found under the eagle head on the right side of the blade.


11 jul 2008, 14:33
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Bericht 1913
As soon as the British army realised the their production capacity would not be sufficient to follow the massive expansion of their army during the First World War, they searched for an alternative supply. In the United States, a country which remained neutral until German attack on the Lusitania in 1917, the Winchester and Remington factories were willing to start production of the newly developed Pattern 1914 (P14) rifle in .303 calibre and its bayonet.

This bayonet was nearly identical to the P1907 bayonet but can easily be recognised by the grooves that were cut into the wooden handles. This difference was necessary because the P1907 and the P1913 were not interchangeable do to differences in the muzzle ring diameter and the length of the crosspiece.

The P14 rifle did not see any action at the Western front during the First World War but as the P1913/1914 bayonet was interchangeable with the US M1917 bayonet, the stocks at Winchester and Remington were used to fit to the M1917 .30-06 rifles.

There are major differences in stamps between the P1913/1914 and the M1917 bayonets. The P1913/1914 is still stamped with typically British marks. This model was followed by a transitional version, which had the original British stamps struck through and US marks added (eagle head, “U S” and the ordnance logo which is also known as the “flaming onion”).
Finally the M1917 was stamped with “1917” as well as the same US marks as the transitional model. The “1917” does not refer to the year of production, just to the model name. The last 2 digits of the year of manufacture can be found under the eagle head on the right side of the blade.


17 jul 2008, 10:43
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Bericht Re: 1913
virjinz schreef:
.....

This bayonet was nearly identical to the P1907 bayonet but can easily be recognised by the grooves that were cut into the wooden handles. This difference was necessary because the P1907 and the P1913 were not interchangeable do to differences in the muzzle ring diameter and the length of the crosspiece.....

.


"do" moet "due" zijn


17 jul 2008, 10:58
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Bericht Re: 1913
virjinz schreef:
There are major differences in stamps between the P1913/1914 and the M1917 bayonets. The P1913/1914 is still stamped with typically British marks. This model was followed by a transitional version, which had the original British stamps struck through and US marks added (eagle head, “U S” and the ordnance logo which is also known as the “flaming onion”).
Finally the M1917 was stamped with “1917” as well as the same US marks as the transitional model. The “1917” does not refer to the year of production, just to the model name. The last 2 digits of the year of manufacture can be found under the eagle head on the right side of the blade.


Met die US afnames ken ik alleen M1917´s die ook daadwerkelijk voor de USA gemaakt zijn. De door de Amerikanen overgenomen exemplaren uit productie voor de Britten zie je met doorgehaalde Britse merken en "US" toegevoegd. Die stukken zijn in de periode van ongeveer augustus/oktober 1917 voor de Britten gemaakt. Er is ook nog een klein aantal M1917´s uit 1918 productie waar abusievelijk "1918" als productiejaar op staat, in plaats van het modeljaar 1917. Als ik me niet vergis heeft Gary Cunningham er in zijn Bayo Points ook wat over geschreven.


Afbeelding


Afbeelding


17 jul 2008, 11:10
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Bericht Re: 1913
virjinz schreef:
There are major differences in stamps between the P1913/1914 and the M1917 bayonets. The P1913/1914 is still stamped with typically British marks. This model was followed by a transitional version, which had the original British stamps struck through and US marks added (eagle head, “U S” and the ordnance logo which is also known as the “flaming onion”).
Finally the M1917 was stamped with “1917” as well as the same US marks as the transitional model. The “1917” does not refer to the year of production, just to the model name. The last 2 digits of the year of manufacture can be found under the eagle head on the right side of the blade.


Ik weet niet of we het over hetzelfde hebben, maar de twee cijfers onder de eagle´s head zijn het nummer van de inspecteur.


17 jul 2008, 11:13
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Dat cijfer bedoelde ik eigenlijk. Dus dat zou niet voor het jaar van productie staan. Is er dan een andere manier om dat jaar te achterhalen?


29 jul 2008, 18:23
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Voor zover ik weet is er geen manier om het productiejaar te achterhalen, tenzij je er eentje hebt waar abusievelijk 1918 op staat.

Ga voor je teksten over US bajonetten eens te rade bij de bajo points van Gary Cunningham. Die geeft een schat aan informatie. Ik zou zijn teksten niet letterlijk copiëren, maar je kunt er info uit halen en er naar verwijzen/doorlinken. Bv hier over de M1917: http://www.usmilitaryknives.com/bayo_points_10.htm


29 jul 2008, 20:33
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Volgens Cunningham zijn contract data en aantallen nog niet bekend.
Bron: American Military Bayonets of the 20th century

M1917 verwijst volgens mijn eigen data naar het model.
Helaas is het te oud en niet volledig om nog de bron te achterhalen :cry:

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29 jul 2008, 20:45
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jdeleur schreef:
Volgens Cunningham zijn contract data en aantallen nog niet bekend.
Bron: American Military Bayonets of the 20th century

M1917 verwijst volgens mijn eigen data naar het model.
Helaas is het te oud en niet volledig om nog de bron te achterhalen :cry:


De bajo points heeft hij later geschreven dan zijn boek en bevatten correcties en aanvullingen daarop.


29 jul 2008, 21:30
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de site is na het Nederlands ook in het Duits en Engels beschikbaar.
leuk voor de anderstalige bezoekers maar ondergetekend daardoor wel een pak meer werk als er iets aangepast moet worden :-(
Daarom heb ik onlangs de pagina's die verwijzen naar Belgische bajonetten offline gehaald. Steeds nieuwe info beschikbaar en dus teveel aanpassingswerk!


06 maart 2009, 12:23
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Ik zou enkel nederlandstalig houden. Voor vertalingen kunnen ze toch gewoon google translate gebruiken?

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06 maart 2009, 21:34
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