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 bajonet.be in english 
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Luitenant-Kolonel
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Ziet er goed uit.
Wat bedoel je met TROEVEN in de laatste alinea?
Ik neem aan dat die smiley niet zichtbaar is in de tekst wanneer je hem upload.

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22 feb 2008, 11:59
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ik weet niet hoe "troeven" vertaald wordt en heb geen woordenboek in de buurt :-)
en die smiley komt door de combinatie van 8 en ) ... Sturmgewehr 58 met een haakje erachter


22 feb 2008, 12:34
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Brigade-Generaal
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Je zou troeven, dat volgens mij een typisch Vlaamse uitdrukking is voor voordelen of sterke punten, in jouw tekst kunnen vertalen met features.


22 feb 2008, 13:34
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of assets ...

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22 feb 2008, 13:36
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ik heb een omwegje rond dit "probleem" gemaakt en gesproken van "interesting features" :-)


22 feb 2008, 13:45
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Bericht P1907
P1907 "Lee Enfield"

The British Army considered the bayonet attack as the ultimate proof of courage. Sometimes the soldiers weren’t even allowed to load their rifles because the commanders wanted to decide the battle with a bayonet charge.
During the First World War this proved to be a very dangerous attitude, especially if the enemy was equipped with state-of-the-art machineguns.
On the first day of the Battle of the Somme, 1st of July 1916, British losses exceeded 60000 men because soldiers were instructed to advance side-by-side towards the German lines. The German’s major concern was how to cool the barrels of their machineguns sufficiently in order to be able to continue shooting at the British soldiers.

The P1907 is a so called sword-knife, too long to be a knife, too short to be called a sword. It was adopted by all the armies of the British Commonwealth Forces to be used on the Short Magazine Lee Enfield rifle (SMLE). Most of the Commonwealth countries had their own factories and therefore British, Canadian, Australian, South-African and Indian versions of the P1907 bayonet exist.

The original design was based on the Japanese T30 bayonet and had a quillon, just like that Japanese counterpart. In 1914 the British realised that this quillon often got stuck in barbed wire and instructions were given to cut off the quillon on existing bayonets and manufacture new models without it. Another modification was the addition of a cleaning hole to the pommel.

On British bayonets you can find many stamps, especially on the ricasso, the base of the blade, both on the left as the right side.
The big “1907” stamped on the left side is related to the model and not to the year of manufacture. The month and year when the bayonet was made can be found just underneath that “1907”. April 1917 for example would be stamped as “4 17”.
Other stamps that figure on most British bayonets are the “Broad Arrow” for acceptance by the British army and an “X” which indicates a positive result for the bend test.


22 feb 2008, 14:11
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Bericht M1889
In 1889 Belgium was the first to adopt a rifle of the Mauser design to equip it’s army. This technically advanced rifle was fitted with one of the 2 major variations of the M1889 bayonet; a short model (376mm) for the Civil Guard and a longer (424mm) version for infantry and pioneers.

Until 1914 production was done by FN in Herstal (Fabrique Nationale d'Armes de Guerre de Herstal, National Factory of War Arms of Herstal) en de MAE (Manufacture d'Armes d'Etat, State Arms Factory). After the German invasion in August 1914 these factories fell almost immediately in German hands. This forced the Belgian army to order another company to start the production. It was Hopkins & Allen, with facilities in Birmingham (United Kingdom) and Norwich (Connecticut, United States) that was chosen to fulfil the contract.

Production figures were relatively small compared to bayonets of major countries like France, England, Germany of the United States. Those nations had armies of several millions of soldiers whereas the Belgian armed forces counted only about 400 000 men.

Nevertheless the M1889 is considered as a more or less common bayonet. The difficulty is to find a specimen in good condition though as most of the M1889 seem to have suffered during the last century.
Examples produced by Hopkins & Allen seem to be less common than the pré-war M1889’s.


22 feb 2008, 14:36
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Bericht M9
This bayonet was modelled after the so-called survival knives. The best-known examples of the kind of knives are without a doubt the Buck 184 and John Rambo’s knife. The original design was made by Qual-A-Tec, the company that founded Phrobis III.
It’s design dates from a period when solid saw-backed knives were very popular. Together with the scabbard this bayonet could be used as a wire-cutter as well. The relatively soft steel of the blade was often damaged when cutting a hard wire. Sometimes the M9 tends to break when considerable pressure is applied to the side of the blade.

The M9 was initially meant for the Navy Seals but was adopted for all regular troops in the US army in 1987. Other nations like Australia, the Netherlands and Taiwan used bayonets of this design as well.


Laatst bijgewerkt door virjinz op 22 feb 2008, 15:03, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt.



22 feb 2008, 14:36
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Bericht VZ24
Just like the Austrian-Hungarian M1895 the VZ24 has a blade which is fixed « upside-down » . Although this is a common bayonet that has been available to collectors for decades now, relatively little is know about this model.

It is certain though, that several hundreds of thousands of these bayonets were used or produced by the Germans during the Second World War. After the invasion in Czechoslovakia the German troops discovered enormous stocks of these rifles and bayonets, which they thankfully used to arm their own troops.

The ground off the muzzle ring of some of these in order to make them suitable for use on their 98 carbine. Production was started as well in the captured CSZ factory in Brno. These pieces are “dot” stamped, the German maker’s code for that factory. The newly produced pieces were made without a muzzle ring;

When the German army was forced to abandon the majority of its weapons these bayonets were offered to other countries like Turkey, Romania, Ethiopia and Peru, which adopted them officially.
Army surplus wholesalers bought masses of VZ24’s and “restored” them by polishing, re-blueing, Parkerizing or sandblasting the blades.


22 feb 2008, 14:52
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Bericht Re: M9
virjinz schreef:
Sometimes the M9 tends to break when an important force is applied to the side the side of the blade.


Ik zou 'important' veranderen door bijvoorbeeld 'much' of 'a lot of'.

Je wordt er steeds beter in :wink:

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22 feb 2008, 14:56
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Bericht M1908
The list of South-American countries that equipped their armies with German rifles and bayonets is very long. Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru, … They all chose for the high quality of the German manufactured weapons. The Brazilian army tried to distinguish its otherwise very standard bayonet by adding a brass mounted leather scabbard.

Specimens of the M1908 without any maker’s mark are known. These can be copies or a Brazilian production. These unmarked examples are often made of lesser quality steel than the German made pieces.


22 feb 2008, 15:00
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Bericht Re: M9
Meut schreef:
Ik zou 'important' veranderen door bijvoorbeeld 'much' of 'a lot of'

Het is "considerable pressure" geworden :-)


22 feb 2008, 15:04
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Bericht M1905
The first pattern Ross bayonets had a very remarkably shaped, almost blunt, blade and a rather uncommon handle. Although the pommel is stamped with “ROSS RIFLE CO. QUEBEC PATENTED 1907”, the bayonet was intended for use on the M1905 “Ross” rifle. The first version of the rifle was not designed with a bayonet lug and it was only in 1908 that the Canadian government decided to add this feature.

Test showed that the shape of the blade did not allow the bayonet to penetrate thick layers of clothing and the decision to modify the point to a much sharper form.

In 1910 the M1910 rifle was adopted and, due to the bigger muzzle diameter of the new rifle, new bayonets had to be designed. The Canadian army chose a model that was almost identical to the sharpened M1905 but had a bigger muzzle ring. The inner diameter of some of the existing M1905 bayonets muzzle rings were filed out until they were 2.4mm larger.

During the First World War, the Ross rifle soon became infamous due to its tendency to jam when used in the trenches. It was much appreciated for its accuracy but the mud and clay at the Western Front made the Ross rifle useless.

After the war the United States bought about 20000 rifles and bayonets to equip their Home Guard. These specimens were stamped with “US” and the American ordnance logo (a flaming bomb). Official and commercial conversions of these bayonets to daggers are known as well.


22 feb 2008, 15:41
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Bericht M1910
In 1910 the M1910 rifle was adopted and, due to the bigger muzzle diameter of the new rifle, new bayonets had to be designed. The Canadian army chose a model that was almost identical to the sharpened M1905 but had a bigger muzzle ring. The inner diameter of some of the existing M1905 bayonets muzzle rings were filed out until they were 2.4mm larger.

During the First World War, the Ross rifle soon became infamous due to its tendency to jam when used in the trenches. It was much appreciated for its accuracy but the mud and clay at the Western Front made the Ross rifle useless.

After the war the United States bought about 20000 rifles and bayonets to equip their Home Guard. These specimens were stamped with “US” and the American ordnance logo (a flaming bomb). Official and commercial conversions of these bayonets to daggers are known as well.


22 feb 2008, 15:41
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In 1939, with the adoption of the No. 4 MK I bayonet, the British army returned to the roots of the bayonet. The No. 4 was a socket bayonet fitted with a “blade” with the form of a spike. Due to that somewhat awkward form the British soldiers soon called it the “pig sticker”.

Singer Manufacturing produced all specimens of the first model, which featured 4 grooves in the spike. This world famous American manufacturer of sewing machines produced the No. 4 Mk. I bayonets in its factory in Clydebank, Scotland.

When the British army suddenly needed millions of rifles and bayonets to supply to their soldiers during the first stage of the Second World War, solutions were searched to simplify the design and production of the No. 4 bayonet. As a result the No. 4 MKII bayonet, which lacks the 4 grooves in the blade, was adopted in 1940. Some 3 million pieces of this model were made.

A further simplification led to the adoption of the No. 4 MKII*. This bayonet was no longer made of one piece but consisted of 2 separate parts, the socket and the spike, which were welded together. All of the about one million pieces were manufactured in Great-Britain.

The last version of the No. 4 bayonet was introduced in 1943 and is known as the No. 4 MKIII. This model clearly shows how the lack of raw materials forced the industry to come up with ideas that could minimize the use of steel. The new mark III consisted of 7 sheath steel parts that were welded together and onto a spike. All 196000 of these No. 4 MKIII bayonets were made by Joseph Lucas Ltd. in Birmingham. For about 4000 of these that company used recycled blades of the very rare Sten SMG bayonet. These very rare bayonets can be recognised by the “L” stamped on the blade.

Because the differences between the No. 4 MK I and the much rarer (and therefore much more expensive!) No. 4 MKII are limited, several dishonest people have attempted to convert the MKII into MK I’s by adding 4 grooves.

Although it didn’t have a cutting edge, No. 4 bayonet could seriously injure an opponent. To make it usable without being placed on the rifle the British added a bayonet lug to the handle of their entrenching tool.

Just like there are several versions of the No. 4 bayonet, there exist various models of scabbards. The first pattern consisted of a conical metal tube with a ball finial. Through that ball a small hole was drilled to allow any water to get out of the scabbard.
The second model was a straight metal tube, which was much easier to manufacture than the conical tube. It was no longer closed by a ball finial but by a screw fit plug. A plastic version of this MKII scabbard exists.
Another model is the 100% molded plastic scabbard which was developed and made by the American Victory Plastics.


Laatst bijgewerkt door virjinz op 27 feb 2008, 10:48, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt.



22 feb 2008, 16:56
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